Quick Answer: What Should The Person Who Makes The Call To EMS Be Prepared To Tell The Dispatcher?

What information will you need to provide to the EMS dispatcher?

Helpful basic information to provide include whether the victims are breathing, pulse present and any significant bleeding or other life-threatening injuries..

What happens if you call 911 and don’t say anything?

But what happens if a 911 dispatcher hears nothing but silence? … Still, because some silent calls are true emergencies, 911 dispatchers are trained to follow silent call protocols. That means immediately sending a police officer to the call location—if the caller used a landline.

When you call 911 where does it go?

When you dial into 911: The signal goes to the phone company’s database. There, it finds out the information that you supply the phone company when you start your service. Then your signal, along with the information is sent to us in the form of Automatic Name and Location information (ANI/ALI).

What is the most critical information to give a 911 dispatcher?

Time is one of the most important factors when handling an emergency call, especially with a medical emergency, and that’s why the dispatchers are trained to help in any way they can in the minutes before emergency response personnel can arrive, and that includes providing emergency medical dispatch information, said …

What is the first thing you need to tell the 911 dispatcher?

That’s why, when you make a 911 call with your cell phone, your exact location and your phone number should be the first bit of information you give in case you are disconnected. No matter what, some sort of emergency personnel can be dispatched to where you are, and they can call you back if need be.

Can 911 hang up on you?

What if I accidentally call 911? If you accidently dial 911, from your home or cell phone stay on the line and tell the Emergency Communications Officer what happened. If you hang up, we have to call you back and that could tie up a line for someone who really needs it. Hanging up is a real hang up for 911.

When making a 911 call what are the three W’s?

When you call 911, the most important thing to do is to remain as calm as possible. The emergency dispatcher will ask details about the 5 W’s: what, where, who, when and perhaps why. Be as concise and clear in your responses as possible to best help those in danger or need.

When you call EMS what information is important to provide?

Your name, phone number and location. 3. The location of the emergency. (Be as specific as possible including street names, address, major landmarks or cross streets, mile markers.)

What percentage of 911 calls are not emergencies?

20%To use it for any other type of calls, such as a prank call, could be considered a crime. Some Public Safety Answering Points (PSAPs) report that 15%–20% of incoming 911 calls are non-emergencies.

What do you tell the 911 operator?

When you call 911, a call-taker will answer the phone and say “911” or “911, what’s your emergency?”. Ideally, you should tell the call-taker what the emergency is, for example: “My house is on fire!” “There’s someone breaking into my home!”

Can you text 911 if you can’t talk?

Simply stated, call if you can, text if you can’t. Text 911 if you need EMERGENCY police, fire or medical aid AND you are Deaf, hard of hearing, or speech disabled OR you cannot speak due to a medical emergency OR when a voice call might endanger your life or escalate the situation.

What are the two types of emergencies?

Two types of emergencies that require first aid: Injury and sudden illness.

What are the most common 911 calls?

The five most frequent causes with known origin counted for more than 40 % of calls in the study period and were categorized as “Wounds, fractures, minor injuries” (13 %), “Chest pain/heart disease” (11 %), “Accidents” (9 %), “Intoxication, poisoning, drug overdose” (8 %) and “breathing difficulties” (7 %). Fig.

What is a 911 dispatcher schedule like?

Generally, Dispatchers work a 40-hour week; however, rotating shifts, compressed work schedules, and overtime are common. Alternative work schedules are necessary to accommodate evening, weekend, and holiday work and around-the-clock operations.

Do dispatchers wear uniforms?

After that, the dispatchers wore their own clothes. I have seen some comm centers where the dispatchers are rarely in public view, but they still wear uniforms. Sometimes the uniforms are the military-style, similar to police uniforms, and sometimes they’re the polo shirt-and-slacks variety.

When calling 911 What are 3 important details you will need to tell the dispatcher?

When calling 9-1-1 your child needs to know their name, parent’s name, telephone number, and most importantly their address. Tell them to answer all the call takers questions and to stay on the phone until instructed to hang up.

How do deaf people call 911?

In most areas, deaf and hard of hearing residents can only seek emergency assistance from a 911 call center (also known as a Public Safety Answering Point or “PSAP”) by using a TTY or a relay service, both of which are time-consuming. … The NAD continues to advocate for implementation of text-to-911 across the country.

Can you call 911 if you feel unsafe?

If you or someone else is not in immediate danger you don’t call 911. … That’s for life/desth(or extreme injury.)

Does 911 always call back?

We are obligated to call back every 911 hang up. Each agency has their own policy on how they are handle it beyond that. If the call is from a land line, as opposed to a wireless phone, there should be an address to send the police to for a check.

Can 911 track your cell phone location?

Historically, 911 dispatchers have been unable to track the locations of callers on cell phones as accurately as those calling from landlines. … This location information must be available for at least 50% of wireless 911 calls, a requirement which increases to 70% in 2020.

What does an EMS dispatcher do?

An emergency medical dispatcher is a professional telecommunicator, tasked with the gathering of information related to medical emergencies, the provision of assistance and instructions by voice, prior to the arrival of emergency medical services (EMS), and the dispatching and support of EMS resources responding to an …